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Going Green On Top: Heat-Mitigation Design is an Emerging Climate Solution

December 4, 2019

Going Green On Top: Heat-Mitigation Design is an Emerging Climate Solution on morrissegroup.com

Commercial real estate is a cool key player in new green solutions

Most discussions about climate change and South Florida focus on sea-level rise. The topic is one of the major concerns when predicting storm surges during hurricane season, and it’s a regular headache for more and more residents during periods of King Tide.

Temperature is less frequently one of the region’s climate change talking points—even though South Florida is coming off one of the warmest summers and autumns on record. For many, the feeling is that it’s supposed to be hot here. But is it supposed to be this hot?

CRE can help cool things off

A recent study from the Urban Land Institute, Scorched: Extreme Heat and Real Estate, took an in-depth look at the causes, concerns, and cures for the Urban Heat Island Effect, a very real phenomenon in which asphalt and cement absorb heat during the course of the day and then radiate that heat throughout the evening. The result is a marked heat difference between downtown and rural areas. In turn, this can have a negative impact on the environment, the economy, and public health.

In many areas of the country, the loss of green space for the sake of development has played a huge role in raising temperatures. The good news, however, is that CRE development is playing a larger role in cooling things off. Designers and developers around the country are incorporating cutting-edge heat-mitigating technologies in their new projects.

Among these are the creation of green roofs; gardens in the sky that can reduce a building’s energy consumption and stormwater run-off while improving sound insulation and filtering out pollutants. They also help reduce urban temperatures.

Things to know before going green on top

Although it’s far easier to incorporate a rooftop garden at the start of the design process, existing buildings can also participate in this greener solution—one that is considered a high-impact temperature reduction strategy. There are, though, a few things to consider:

  • A structural engineer first needs to evaluate the load capacity of the roof, since rooftop gardens are quite heavy. A watered garden with a 6” soil depth can weigh up to 40lbs. per square foot.
  • In addition, the waterproof integrity of the roof also needs to be evaluated. The last thing any owner wants is to install a rooftop garden and then discover that there is a leak beneath the soil—or that the membrane was damaged during installation.
  • Working with a rooftop garden designer, owners and landlords can decide the type of garden, the plant selection, any safety issues should the public have access and alternatives if a full garden is not an option.

Embracing heat-resilient technologies comes with unique challenges but also significant rewards for CRE developers and investors, especially in the areas of new project development, marketing, and operations.

South Florida’s coolest solution

There is little doubt that South Florida is hot—in terms of temperature and the real estate market. And Morris Southeast Group recognizes the immense value of finding sustainable and ethical solutions that also enhance ROI. Our professionals can help you brainstorm smart, green CRE options and connect you with leaders in the field.

To learn more about what Morris Southeast Group can do for you, call us at 954.474.1776. You can also reach Ken Morris directly at 954.240.4400 or via email at kenmorris@morrissegroup.com.

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